Some people eat, sleep and chew gum, I do genealogy and write...

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Latin Legal Terms for Genealogists -- Part Eleven


Genealogists who do research into legal and church documents in any time period, up to and including the present, will run into a plethora of legal terms in Latin. This is especially true for countries in Europe. For this reason, I began explaining and analyzing some of the more common Latin legal terms. This is part 11 of the series. By the way, this series is not intended to comprehensive. My selection is based on 39 years of trial work. I have only selected those terms that I actually used or heard used during my years of experience.

So here we go:

pendente lite -- literally "while litigation is pending"
Usually, refers to an order entered by the judge (court) that affects the parties to a lawsuit during the time the matter is in the court process. For example, in a marital dissolution case (divorce) the judge might order custody of the children (if any) to one of the parties until the matter is completely resolved. Generally, the pendente lite orders either expire at the end of the litigation or are made permanent in the final court order or judgment. You may also see the term lis pendens used for temporary orders during the course of the litigation. The term lis pendens is usually used in real property disputes to enter an order showing that a judgment against the property, i.e. a foreclosure action, is possible and preventing the transfer of the property during the pendency of the litigation.

parens patriae -- literally "parent of the nation"
This statement is used to show that the government involved has the right to act as the parent to a child when the child's biological parents are unable or unwilling to provide support.

obiter dictum -- literally "a thing said in passing"
Some of the legal jargon, i.e. Latin phrases, used by attorneys have perfectly suitable non-Latin equivalents. As I have pointed out previously, some of these Latin phrases have become so common that it is now essentially an English word. The English word "dicta" has evolved from this phrase. This phrase is really quite vague. It is used to refer to any comments made by a judge in a written court opinion that those opposing people the opinion do not think support the conclusion or are used to extend the application of the opinion beyond what is fully supported by previously decided case law or stare decisis.

nunc pro tunc -- literally "now for then"
Without some context, even the literal meaning of this phrase does not make sense. I doubt that those who use this phrase even know what it means in English. I can't classify it as a Latin phrase that has passed into the English language because I don't think anyone outside of the legal profession would have a clue about its meaning. It is used to indicate an action taken by a judge to correct an obvious error in a judgment or a ruling and to indicate further that the change dates back to the date of the original order or judgment. The changed or corrected order is designated as issued nunc pro tunc.

nulla bona -- literally "no goods"
This is is a phrase that is now becoming very scarce simply because the people who note when a defendant who has an adverse judgment has no tangible property that can be seized to pay the judgment do not know any Latin phrases. It means that the sheriff or constable could not find any property.

I realize that I am only giving five definitions lately, but there is a lot to write about and I do get pressed for time. I did want to keep this particular series going however.

Here are the previous posts in this series.

http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2017/05/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2017/01/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/10/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/08/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/07/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part_28.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/07/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/06/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part_26.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/06/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part_16.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/06/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html
http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/2016/05/latin-legal-terms-for-genealogists-part.html

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Genealogical Beginnings


The organized activity of gathering historical information dates back into antiquity. One of the early notable collections of knowledge was the Library of Alexandria in Egypt. This huge library is estimated to have more than 40,000 parchment and papyrus scrolls. Not all of this collection was genealogy, but it is likely that some of it was. Of course, we have some selective genealogies in the Bible. In Western Europe, genealogy was originally the purvue of kings and nobles and used primarily to establish the legitimately of various claims to power. In some areas of the world, such as China, genealogies have been kept for thousands of years.

But there is little about modern genealogy that really relates back to these more ancient practices. The first historical society in the United States was established in 1845. This is was and is the New England Historic Genealogical Society of Boston, Massachusetts. Currently, the Federation of Genealogical Societies in the United States has over 500 members. In England, the Society of Genealogists was founded in 1911. Genealogy, as it is practiced today, is a rather recent innovation based on some of the historical concepts with some modern twists.

There is one book that sets forth the history of genealogy in the United States and I have referred to it in past posts, but I needed to remind all of my readers of the necessity of understanding the history that brought to where we are today. Here is the book:

Weil, François. Family Trees: A History of Genealogy in America. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.4159/harvard.9780674076341.

This book explains how and sometimes why we have vast online genealogical databases and reading this book will give you a perspective that you may not presently have. Remember that those who ignore history are bound to repeat it.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Map Guide to German Parish Registers

For anyone doing in depth German research, the series of books called the "Map Guide to German Parish Registers" is a valuable asset. The set is probably only completely available at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, however, I have compiled a list of 89 items most of which are in the series. You can determine if a library near you has a copy of a particular volume by searching in WorldCat.org. I have seen that many volumes are also for sale on Amazon.com. Here is what I was able to find. I would also suggest checking with Family Roots Publishing. Leland Meitzler of Family Roots Publishing can likely tell you which volumes are available for purchase.

Hansen, Kevan. Map Guide to German Parish Registers - Free City of Hamburg. Family Roots Publishing Company, 2016.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers - Kingdom of Bavaria Niederbayern I.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers - Kingdom of Bavaria X -Gazetteer & Master Index to Volumes 13-22.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers - Kingdom Saxony I.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers Vol 42. Family Roots Publishing, 2013.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers Vol 43. Family Roots Publishing, 2013.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers Vol 44. Family Roots Publishing, 2013.
Hansen, Kevan M. Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen) French Department of Bas-Rhin, Kreise (Arrondissements) Erstein, Schlettstadt Ans Strassburg with Full Index of Included Towns 2, 2,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2010.
———. Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen) French Department of Haut-Rhin Kreise (Arrondissements) Altkirch and Thann, and the Territory of Belfort with Full Index of Included Towns 4, 4,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen) French Department of Haut-Rhin Kreise (Arrondissements) Gebweiler, Kolmar, Mülhausen and Rappoltsweiler with Full Index of Included Towns 3, 3,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen) French Department of Lorraine Kreise (Arrondissements) Bolchen, Diedenhofen, Forbach, Metz and Saargemünd with Full Index of Included Towns 5, 5,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen) French Department of Lorraine Kreise (Arrondissements) Saarburg and Salzburg, with Full Index of Included Towns 6, 6,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen) ... with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, UT: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2010.
———. Kingdom of Bavaria 2 2. Bountiful, UT: Family Roots Publ., 2007.
———. Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Brandenburg ...: With Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2012.
———. Kingdom of Prussia, Province of East Prussia ...: With Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Hannover: With Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2010.
———. Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Pomerania ...: With Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Kingdom of Prussia - Province of Sachsen: With Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2009.
———. Kingdom of Prussia, Province of West Prussia ...: With Full Index of Included Towns, 2013.
———. Kingdom of Saxony ...: With Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2009.
———. Kingdom of Württemberg ...: With Full Index of Included Towns. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, Utah: K.M. Hansen, 2004.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2005.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2005.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2007.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2007.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine II (Elsas-Lothringen), District of Unterelsass, French Department of Bas-Rhin, Kreise (Arrondissements) Erstein, Schlettstadt and Strassburg ; with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2010.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine III (Elsas-Lothringen), District of Oberelsass I, French Department of Haut-Rhin, Kreise (Arrondissements) Gebweiler, Kolmar, Mülhausen and Rappoltsweiler ; with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Kingdom of Bavaria III : Regierungsbezirk Mittelfranken with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, UT: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2007.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Kingdom of Bavaria II, Regierungsbezirk Oberfranken. Bountiful, UT: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2007.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Kingdom of Bavaria: With Full Index of Included Towns.” Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2007.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Sachsen: With Full Index of Included Towns.” Bountiful, UT: Family Roots Publishing, 2009.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Silesia Iii. Orting: Family Roots Publishing, 2016.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Westphalia II, Regierungsbezirke Arnsberg and the Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont, with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing, 2011.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Westphalia: With Full Index of Included Towns.” Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing, 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Kingdom of Württemberg. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Province of Rhineland: With Full Index of Included Towns.” Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2007.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns.” Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2007.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2007.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers: With Full Index of Included Towns.” North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2008.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns.” Bountiful, Urah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Publishing Co., 2009.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2010.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns,” 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2013.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2013.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 26, Vol. 26,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2009.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 31, Vol. 31,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2010.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 33, Vol. 33,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2010.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 36, Vol. 36,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 37, Vol. 37,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 38, Vol. 38,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns Vol. 39, Vol. 39,. Bountiful, Utah: Family Roots Pub. Co., 2011.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Street Index, 2013.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Street Index, 2017.
———. Province of Schleswig-Holstein, Kingdom of Prussia and Grandduchy of Oldenburg: With Full Index of Included Towns. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
Hansen, Kevan M, and Leland K Meitzler. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2008.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers., 2010.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Grandduchy of Hessen: With Full Index of Included Towns,” 2014.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Hessen-Nassau: With Master Index of Towns from Both Volumes.” Bountiful, UT: Family Roots Publishing, 2014.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers - Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Hanover III. Family Roots Publishing Company, 2009.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2014.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2015.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2015.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2015.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2016.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Index of Included Towns, 2016.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. with Full Street Index, 2016.
Hansen, Kevan M, and George Ott. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Hessen-Nassau, Regierungsbezirk Wiesbaden, Kingdom of Prussia: With Master Index of Towns from Both Volumes.” North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2005.
———. Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Vol. 7, Vol. III, Vol. 7, Vol. III,. North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
———. “Map Guide to German Parish Registers. Vol. 8, Vol. IV, Vol. 8, Vol. IV,” 2004.
———. “Map Guide to the German Parish Registers, Kingdom of Württemberg: With Full Index of Included Towns.” North Salt Lake, UT: Heritage Creations, 2004.
Koenigsberger, H. G, George L Mosse, and G. Q Bowler. Europe in the Sixteenth Century. London: Routledge, Taylor and Francis, 2013. http://public.eblib.com/choice/publicfullrecord.aspx?p=1710605.
Map Guide to German Parish Registers: Imperial Province of Alsace-Lorraine Iv. Bountiful: Family Roots Pub., 2011.

Calendars make a difference in research results


One change here in Utah is that I have to get used to daylight savings time again. Arizona is one of the few places in the United States that stays on the same time all year round. So, I have a hard time with changing twice a year. Just think, as genealogists we have all sorts of times and dates to consider. It is not unusual for researchers to have to deal with multiple calendars. Here is a list of a few of the calendars you might encounter:
  • The Julian to Gregorian Calendar changes
  • The French Republican Calendar
  • The Hebrew Calendar
  • The Revised Julian Calendar or the Meletian calendar
There are dozens of different calendars that have been used in different parts of the world at different times. The short list above includes the ones you would most likely find in your research if your ancestors came from Europe. If your ancestors came from an Asian country such as China, you would have to adapt to the Chinese calendar. The effect of all these calendars the historical changes in the use of one or another is that the dates you find in records may have to be translated into our modern calendar to make sense.

Why do calendars matter? The best way to answer that question is to look at an example of the date changes. What if I were doing research in France and ran across this "date?" 2 Messidor VIII. First of all, would you even recognize this as a date? What would your current genealogy program do with the date if you entered it as it is? By the way, here is what the FamilySearch.org Family Tree would do with that date:


OK, so depending on the program, the date could be left as it is or translated into the current version of the Gregorian calendar. Here are some programs for translating dates in the various calendars.

If you run into another calendar system, it is highly likely that there will be a converter on the internet. For example here is the Mayan Calendar Converter:

https://maya.nmai.si.edu/calendar/maya-calendar-converter


Saturday, July 22, 2017

Who has what in genealogy? What do the large online genealogy programs really have?


Large online genealogy databases are the present day technological reality. Because they have become ubiquitous, they have also assumed a level of comprehensiveness that is entirely unwarranted. After searching in one or more of these online behemoths, an inexperienced genealogist could wrongfully conclude that there was no place left to look. In making this observation, I am in no way denigrating the importance of these huge record collections. They are fabulous and have changed the very nature of genealogical research. But at the same time, it is always important to put these huge collections of records into the context of all of the records that may be available worldwide either readily on the internet or tucked away in individual repositories.

Since these online genealogy programs have billions of records, it would be at least impractical or perhaps impossible to do a record by record comparison of their resources. But a general comparison with some examples may be helpful when evaluating the extent to which the researcher should be looking beyond confining his or her research to the large online programs. However, there is yet another important consideration. Except for FamilySearch.org, all of the other major online genealogical databases have some sort of fee for access.

In making the comparisons, I should point out my conclusion in advance: as a genealogical researcher, you should be searching in all of the programs. You cannot pick and choose without risking overlooking some crucial genealogical sources depending on your personal research objectives. It is tautological to point out that there is a nearly endless number of other online resources in addition to the large database programs, but it is also rather obvious that four websites garner the majority of the online genealogical attention. These four are FamilySearch.org, Ancestry.com, MyHeritage.com, and Findmypast.com.

At one level, any comparison is unfair and prejudicial. The fact that one program has a certain record and one of the other programs does not merely reflects the reality of doing genealogical research. There is yet no all-encompassing and complete repository, online or otherwise, that contains all of the world's records. It is rather easy to select a country around the world that is grossly underrepresented by documents in all four of the websites. This lack of genealogical resources reflects the political, social, religious and cultural backgrounds of all the countries of the world.

Now some examples. First the easy ones. Do any of the websites have records from any of the following countries? In each case, I will be checking the catalog of the website for an indication that some records about the country might be on the website. In making this comparison, I realize that FamilySearch has billions of microfilmed records available through the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. But I am confining my examination to "online" records only and also to records about people from a particular country and not a list of soldiers who fought a war in the country, for example.

  • Vietnam: FamilySearch.org yes, Ancestry.com no, MyHeritage.com no, Findmypast.com no 
  • Yemen: FamilySearch.org yes, Ancestry.com no, MyHeritage.com no, Findmypast.com no
  • Panama: FamilySearch.org yes, Ancestry.com yes, MyHeritage.com yes, Findmypast.com yes
  • Japan: FamilySearch.org yes, Ancestry.com yes, MyHeritage.com no, Findmypast.com no
  • Iceland: FamilySearch.org yes, Ancestry.com yes, MyHeritage.com yes, Findmypast.com no
  • Papua New Guinea: FamilySearch.org yes, Ancestry.com no, MyHeritage.com yes, Findmypast.com yes
Hmm. In some of these cases, there are only one or two records and searching all the records would be relatively quick and easy. In other cases, there were a surprisingly large number of records and no, I did not stack the deck in favor of FamilySearch. 

If you really want to do in depth research anyplace in the world, including the United States and Europe, you need to dig down into the card catalogs of all of these websites as well as look beyond the big four. If anything, this short comparison should indicate that we really do have a lot of records online and that the genealogical methodology is steady and rapidly changing. 



Friday, July 21, 2017

Family Tree Maker 2017 Finally Released



MacKiev.com has finally released its updated version of Family Tree Maker 2017. The program was discontinued by Ancestry.com back in 2015 and then licensed to MacKiev. You can read a review of the new version on GenealogyTools.com. See "Family Tree Maker 2017 Released: A Review."

Thursday, July 20, 2017

German Resources from the Brigham Young University Family History Department


If you have done any research in German language genealogy at the Brigham Young University Family History Library or at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. You probably became acquainted with the writings of Professor Roger P. Minert, a professor of family history at BYU.


Professor Minert has listed 116 books about genealogy and family history on WorldCat.org. I attended the Foundation for Eastern European Family History Studies Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah and attended a number of classes on German research. Professor Minert's name was frequently mentioned. I looked up his publications on WorldCat.org and decided to write about these resources in order to start writing about German genealogical research.

Here is the list to get started. This is the first in a series of posts about German records. These are just the books written by Professor Minert or co-authored. I think you might be interested in some of the books from just one BYU professor if you have German ancestors and this is not a complete list.

Minert, Roger P. Against the Wall: Johann Huber and the First Mormons in Austria, 2015.
———. Alsace-Lorraine place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Alte Kirchenbücher richtig lesen.: Hand- und Übungsbuch für Familiengeschichtsforscher. Wuppertal: Brockhaus, 2008.
———. Baden place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Bavaria place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Brandenburg place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Braunschweig, Oldenburg, and Thuringia place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Consolidated Index to German Immigrants in American Church Records, Volumes 1 through 14, 2015.
———. Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Historical Manuscripts, 2013.
———. Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Vital Records Written in Germany. Woods Cross, Utah: GRT Publications, 2001.
———. East Prussia place names index: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Gerhard Henrich Meinert: His Ancestors and His Descendants. Woods Cross, Utah: GRT Publications, 2000.
———. German census records, 1816-1916: the when, where, and how of a valuable genealogical resource, 2016.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Volume 9, Volume 9,. Rockland, ME: Picton Press, 2010.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Volume 15, Volume 15, 2014.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Volume 16, Part 1 Volume 16, Part 1, 2014.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Volume 17, Volume 17, 2015.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Volume 19, Volume 19, 2016.
———. Hanover place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Hesse-Nassau place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Hesse place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. In Harm’s Way: East German Latter-Day Saints in World War II. Provo, Utah: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2009.
———. Kingdom of Saxony (with Anhalt) place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Mecklenburg place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Palatinate place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Pomerania place names index: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Posen Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical and Reverse Alphabetical Indexes, 2015.
———. Province of Saxony place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Rhineland place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Schleswig-Holstein (with Bremen, Hamburg, and Lübeck) place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Silesia place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Spelling Variations in German Names: Solving Family History Problems through Applications of German and English Phonetics. Woods Cross, Utah: GRT Publications, 2009.
———. “The Influence of Student-Identified Factors on Enrollment in Foreign Language Courses in Public High Schools in the United States,” 1991.
———. The Rauth Family: From Bavaria to Galicia to the United States. Woods Cross, Utah: GRT Publications, 2000.
———. Under the Gun: West German and Austrian Latter-Day Saints in World War II. Provo, Utah: The Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2011.
———. Westphalia (with Hohenzollern, Lippe, Schaumburg-Lippe, & Waldeck) place names indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. West Prussia place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
———. Württemberg Place Name Indexes:Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical and Reverse Alphabetical Index. Woods Cross, Utah: GRT Publications, 2000.
———. Württemberg place name indexes: identifying place names using alphabetical and reverse alphabetical indexes, 2015.
Minert, Roger P, and Casidy A Andersen. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Vol. 6, Vol. 6,. Rockport, ME: Picton Press, 2008.
Minert, Roger P, and Jennifer A Anderson. German Immigrants in American Church Records. Rockport, Maine: Picton Press, 2005.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. v. 1, v. 1,. Rockport, Me.: Picton Press, 2005.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. v. 2, v. 2,. Rockland], Me.: Picton Press, 2007.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. v. 3, v. 3,. Rockland], Me.: Picton Press, 2007.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. v. 4, v. 4,. Rockland, Me.: Picton Press, 2007.
———. German Immigrants in American Church Records. v. 5, v. 5,. Rockland, Me.: Picton Press, 2007.
Minert, Roger P, Kathryn Boeckel, and Caren Winters. Germans to America and the Hamburg Passenger Lists: Coordinated Schedules. Westminster, Md.: Heritage Books, 2007.
Minert, Roger P, Shirley J Riemer, and Susan E Sirrine. Researching in Germany: A Handbook for Your Visit to the Homeland of Your Ancestors. Sacramento, CA: Lorelei Press, 2013.
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Roger P. Minert. “UP Quiz: ‘Was Soll Man Denn Sagen?’” Unteteacgerm Die Unterrichtspraxis / Teaching German 24, no. 1 (1991): 61–63.